A Call for a Collective Action to Develop Awareness: Equity, Excellence and Social Justice in Mathematics Education

As the 2016-2017 school year begins, we invite you to join with educators from around the country and possibly the world in A Call for a Collective Action to Develop Awareness: Equity and Social Justice in Mathematics Education.

Purpose: A year dedicated to building our collective knowledge and understanding of topics and issues related to Equity and Social Justice in Mathematics Education

1. Monthly readings
  • Each organization will identify a key reading (book, collection of published articles, white papers) for ALL to read
  • Group will develop a guiding set of questions to focus the year of reading
  • Start reading September

2. Quarterly webinars

  • One hour webinar – November, February, May, and August
  • 15-20 minutes overview/key take-away(s), considerations, and/or questions of reading for each of the previous months

3. Face-to-Face informal conversations

  • As organizations hold their national conferences/meetings - one morning or evening hour be set aside for those to gather and talk

All TODOS members are asked to participate in this Call to Action by engaging in the following:

  • Participating in the monthly readings either individually or with colleagues
  • Responding to the guiding questions for the readings
  • Participating in the TODOS Discussion Forums (see instructions)
  • Attending and participating in the quarterly webinars

Updates on A Call for a Collective Action will be included in the monthly Enews sent out to members on the 20th of the month. If you have any questions about A Call for a Collective Action or participating in the discussion groups, send a message to requests@todos-math.org. The next page lists all of the organizations participating in his effort. The third page lists the focus questions for the year and the readings for the first three months with the targeted monthly questions.

 

 

Contributing Organizations


Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE)

Benjamin Banneker Association, Inc (BBA)

California Mathematics Council-South (CMC-South)

Journal of Urban Mathematics Education (JUME)

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM)

National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM)

North American Study Group on Ethnomathematics (NASGEm)

TODOS: Mathematics for ALL (TODOS)

Women and Mathematics Education (WME)

 

 

Calendar of Readings

Focus Questions for the Year

  • How might we, the mathematics education community, make a difference in the teaching and learning of mathematics “that promote rich, rigorous, and relevant mathematical experiences” for all students? What key actions should we consider?
  • How does the reading further inform or challenge your understandings of issues related to equity and social justice in mathematics education? What question(s) do you have in regards to the reading(s)?

 

September 2016 Reading

Position Papers:

AMTE - Equity in Mathematics Teacher Education 

NCSM & TODOS - Mathematics Education Through the Lens of Social Justice: Acknowledgment, Actions, and Accountability 

NCTM - Access and Equity in Mathematics Education 

Targeted Question for September Readings:

  • What are some common understandings amongst the three position papers?

 

October 2016 Reading

Suggested by TODOS: Mathematics for ALL

TEEM 7- Special Issue: Mathematics Education Through the Lens of Social Justice

Targeted Questions for October Reading:

  • How do we change the paradigm of what mathematics is and how it should be learned from its current institutional form to one that utilizes the mathematics of people and their communities and ties mathematics to the world?
  • Which of the examples of social justice and mathematics tasks enacted with students that were written about in this journal most resonates with you? Why?

 

November 2016 Reading

Suggested by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM)

The Impact of Identity in K-8 Mathematics.

Targeted Questions for November Reading:

  • What are equitable instructional practices that support the development of students' mathematical identity and sense of agency?
  • How can we advocate for the implementation of these practices?

 

December 2016 Reading

Suggested by the Journal of Urban Mathematics Education (JUME)

Three Articles

Mathematics as Gatekeeper: Power and Privilege in the Production of Knowledge (Martin et al JUME 2010)

“Both And”—Equity and Mathematics: A Response to Martin, Gholson, and Leonard (Confrey JUME 2010)

Engaging Students in Meaningful Mathematics Learning: Different Perspectives, Complementary Goals (Battista JUME 2010)

Targeted Questions for December Reading:

  • How might the larger mathematics education community achieve a both-and approach? 
  • How might the larger mathematics education community begin to respect the different perspectives of doing science employed when rigorously examining the critical issues of “diversity” and “equity” in mathematics education research?

 

January 2017 Reading

Suggested by Benjamin Banneker Association, Inc. (BBA)

Beyond Banneker: Black Mathematicians and the Paths to Excellence (2015) by Erica N. Walker (Author)

Targeted Questions for January Reading:

  • What is the nature of the path for developing mathematics education excellence and scholarship?
  • What challenges do we face and what changes might mitigate them?

 

February 2017 Reading

Suggested by the North American Study Group on Ethnomathematics (NASGEm)

Culturally Situated Design Tools: Generative Justice as a Foundation for STEM Diversity

Critical values and transforming data: Teaching statistics with social justice

Targeted Questions for February Reading:

  • The “pipeline” model for STEM diversity is at best like oil production, taking kids out of their low-income communities for use elsewhere. What alternative models might be available?
  • How does statistics inform questions of equity and justice?
  • How do concepts of equity and justice in turn create rich vehicles for teaching concepts of statistics?

 

March 2017 Reading

Suggested by the Women and Mathematics Education (WME)

Women 1.5 Times More Likely to Leave STEM Pipeline after Calculus Compared to Men: Lack of Mathematical Confidence a Potential Culprit

Targeted Questions for March Reading:

  • What role can mathematics teacher educators play in developing and strengthening K-12 girls' mathematics confidence and identity?
  • What are effective instructional practices that support the development of girls' mathematical confidence, identity and sense of agency? (Note: This is a sub-set "focus" of NCTM's emphasis)

 

April 2017 Reading

Suggested by the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE)

Chapter 16: How Do I Learn to Like This Child So I Can Teach Him Mathematics: The Case of Rebecca (Mary Q. Foote with accompanying commentaries)

  • Commentary 1: Examining Interest Convergence and Identity: A Commentary on Foote’s Case, Robert Q. Berry III.
  • Commentary 2: Supporting a Teacher’s Shift from Deficits to Funds of Knowledge: A Commentary on Foote’s Case, Maura Varley Gutiérrez.
  • Commentary 3: A Commentary on Foote’s Case, Nora G. Ramírez.

 

Chapter from: White, D. Y., Crespo, S. & Civil, M. (Eds.) (2016). Cases for mathematics teacher educators: Facilitating conversations about inequities in mathematics classrooms. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. Link to purchase book: http://www.infoagepub.com/products/Cases-for-Mathematics-Teacher-Educators  

Targeted Questions for April Reading:

 

  • How would you support the teacher in addressing her negative views about the student and his mother?
  • In what ways did the case and commentary authors’ suggestions help you think about the equity-related dilemmas you face in your own work?

 

May 2017 Reading

Suggested by the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM)

Excellence Through Equity: Five Principles of Courageous Leadership to Guide Achievement for Every Student (2016) by Alan M. Blankstein and Pedro Noguera Blanstein & Noguera (2016) talk about courage as the essential human virtue, and how courageous leadership is the “engine that drives the paradigm shift”.

Targeted Questions for May Reading:

  • What are the five principles of courageous leadership to guide achievement for every student discussed by these authors?
  • How does your organization’s vision reflect the five components of courageous leadership? What can we do together to make visible these components?

 

June 2017 Reading

Suggested by Robert Q. Berry III

For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood... and the Rest of Y'all Too: Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education (2016) by Christopher Emdin. The author discusses different types of pedagogies grounded in the resources that communities can offer for teaching; The author introduces 7'Cs.

Targeted Questions for June Reading:

  • What are ways teachers can gain access to community resources (human & material)?
  • How can we make sense of this for mathematics teaching and learning?

 

July 2017 Reading

Suggested by California Mathematics Council-South (CMC-S)

Teaching Mathematics for Social Justice: Conversations with Educators, edited by Anita A. Wager and David W. Stinson

Targeted Questions for July Reading:

  • How might teachers begin to teach mathematics for social justice?  How might teacher educators begin to teach teachers how to teach mathematics for social justice?
  • How might teaching mathematics for social justice "look like?"
  • How can mathematics be re-envisioned as a means to create a more socially just world?

 

August 2017 Reading

Suggested by the Association of State Supervisors of Mathematics (ASSM)

April - Equitable Mathematics Instruction, Great Lakes Equity Center Newsletter
The Mathematical YAWP by Francis Su, MAA past president

Targeted Questions for August Reading:

  • Whom do we shepherd towards taking more math courses and who do we discourage and why?
  • What role does mathematics play in human flourishing and how can we talk about it in our various roles?
  • What actions can we take as individuals, in our home communities, and in our scholarly communities to begin “Genuine Equity Work in Mathematics?”